Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

Posted by freeamfva on April 5th, 2022

Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is most often caused by Escherichia coli or other gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae, and typically affects men 36 to 50 years of age. After an episode of acute bacterial prostatitis, approximately 5% of patients may progress to CBP. [1] Patients may present with a history of relapsing urinary tract infections (UTIs), which may be episodic or persistent. The UTIs are typically not associated with systemic signs of infection. Other irritative or obstructive urologic symptoms may also be present. (See Presentation).To get more news about Chronic prostatitis causes, you can visit our official website.

Analysis of urine specimens and prostatic fluid is used to confirm the diagnosis (see Workup). The main diagnostic criterion for CBP is positive bacterial cultures of prostatic fluidThe prostate gland is part of the male reproductive system, and it is a walnut-sized gland found in men that is located below the bladder and in front of the rectum. It surrounds the urethra, the tube through which urine and semen exit the body. Its main function is to produce seminal fluid in order to transport sperm through the urethra.
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The symptoms associated with prostatitis can vary depending on the underlying cause of prostatitis. The symptoms may appear slowly or come on quickly, and they may improve rapidly (depending on the cause and treatment available) or they may last for several months and they can keep recurring (chronic prostatitis). The rapidity and severity of onset is usually most pronounced with acute bacterial prostatitis. The following are signs and symptoms that may be present with prostatitis:

If you have any of the signs or symptoms consistent with prostatitis, you should see your health care professional for further evaluation. Depending on the symptoms and your response to therapy, your doctor may need to refer you to a urologist (a physician specializing in the genitourinary system).

Prostatitis can be caused by bacteria that leak into the prostate gland from the urinary tract (the most common bacterial cause) and from direct extension or lymphatic spread from the rectum. It can also result from various sexually transmitted organisms such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, or HIV. Other organisms responsible for infection are the same found most frequently in urinary tract infections, such as Escherichia coli. In many instances (especially in the chronic form of prostatitis), no specific cause of prostatitis can be found.

Prostatitis is usually diagnosed by analyzing a urine sample and undergoing an examination of your prostate gland by your health care practitioner. This examination involves a digital rectal examination to palpate the prostate gland and feel for abnormalities of the gland. Occasionally, the physician may also collect and test a sample of the prostatic fluid.

Sometimes a prostate massage is performed to compare samples of the prostatic fluid both before and after this intervention has been performed. To perform this procedure, the doctor will stroke/massage the prostate gland during the digital rectal examination. Because there is the concern that this procedure can release bacteria into the bloodstream, this test is contraindicated in cases of acute bacterial prostatitis.

Additional tests that may be obtained include a complete blood count (CBC), an electrolyte panel, blood cultures, a swab of urethral discharge if present, and sometimes a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. The PSA test, which is used as a screening test for prostate cancer, may also be elevated with prostatitis.

Other tests that may also be obtained include urodynamic tests (to check how well you empty your bladder and establish if prostatitis is affecting your ability to urinate), ultrasound imaging, computed tomography (CT) imaging, cystoscopy, and a prostate biopsy.

If recurring episodes of urinary tract infections and prostatitis occur, see your doctor for a more detailed evaluation of your genitourinary system for anatomic abnormalities, which may make you more prone to infections.Treatment for prostatitis depends on the underlying cause and type of prostatitis. Antibiotics are prescribed if the cause is a bacterial infection. All forms of prostatitis require pain control if needed, treatment, relief of complications and side effects, and need to be closely monitored by your doctor. In certain instances, some people with prostatitis may need to be hospitalized for treatment.

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Joined: June 11th, 2021
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