7 summer to dos for parents of collegebound

Posted by w1lson on August 7th, 2018

Busy parents of teens can get the jump on college planning this summer with these seven activities specifically designed for those lazy, hazy days.

So take it slowly, have some fun and get on top of the college process with these tips from Jet Writers career research paper.

1. Take a road trip

A fun way to learn more about a college is to visit. Make it a collegecation by combining a family vacation with a college visit. Pick a few schools your student is interested in that are relatively close to each other and plot a road trip. Research what is near the school: beaches, rivers, mountains, historical sites, state and national parks, amusement parks, golf, hiking and biking trails. Stop at attractions along the way. Pack accordingly to enjoy family fun activities.

At the college, sit in on the information session, take a tour and chat with prospective and current students and college staff. Enjoy campus perks such as theaters, concerts, museums, arboretums, planetariums and sporting events. Buy a low cost lunch at the food court and picnic under a tree on the beautifully manicured grounds. Toss a Frisbee, relax and have some family fun time while learning about each college.

2. Read a book

Reading a book is a great summer activity. There are tons to choose from on the topic of college planning. Pick a volume about individual colleges, the admission process, financial aid information or scholarship sources.

Relax on a sunny day on a hammock or curl up inside when it rains. Go high tech and download a couple of books and articles on an e-reader. Knowing the facts helps families plan how to select a college, estimate college costs, and afford to pay for the diploma the student will earn.

Bust myths and misconceptions with facts. Find out how to divide and conquer the college process by divvying up tasks. Parents can help students to achieve their college goals. Start by picking out some books for them such as SAT/ACT test prep, improving vocabulary and essay writing skills.

3. Practice the art of conversation with words

Changes come fast in the life of a teen and good communication can be enlightening for parents and helpful for the college-bound. Vocabulary is emphasized on College Admission Tests. Using college level words in personal notes and in conversation will help students prepare.

Parents can add a word to dinner time conversations or brief remarks. Make it a game to see who in the family can use the key word appropriately the most times in a day.

If families select a word or two a day over the summer, students can add about a hundred new words to their vocabulary by the time school starts in the fall. Parents can find College Admission Test vocabulary books at libraries, schools and online.

4. Establish family meetings

Life gets especially hectic and it's easy to let stuff get in the way of meaningful quality time. Summer is a great time to establish regular contact. The goal is to create a habit that can be carried on during the college years and beyond.

Pick a specific day and time to connect. Meetings do not have to be lengthy but should be long enough so each family member has a chance to contribute. Family gatherings can be formal with a set agenda addressing old and new business regarding each step of the college process. They can also be an informal gabfest.

To enhance the family bonding process, make it fun and have a few laughs together. Toss a balloon, tell jokes, play a game and enjoy each other’s company. When students leave for college, family fun time can continue with planned phone calls.

5. Create a college plan calendar

Pace often slows during the summer so take advantage of the downtime to create a calendar for college bound activities. Do it on paper or online for the family to share. Be prepared to modify as needed and encourage students to get involved.

Dare to be specific when listing college prep activities. Since summer is often a school-free zone, study periods for college searches, college admission test prep and college essay writing are more palatable when agreed to with start and end times.

Also include college admission test dates and deadlines. College applications for admission, financial aid, and scholarships have different deadlines. Without a calendar, it can be hard to remember them all.

Be sure to include family fun and individual downtime. Sometimes these don’t happen unless they are planned.

6. Share some college spirit.

Higher education is an exciting learning adventure. Let the thirst for knowledge soar to new heights. Motivate and excite with local resources. From movies to T.V., to live and online events, campuses are chock full of interesting things.

Check out what’s happening at a local college. Summer classes may be offered for parents and students on academic and nonacademic subjects. Buy some college T-shirts and feel the college spirit.

Many schools also offer free or for a fee online classes called MOOCS (Massive Open Online Courses). Families can share knowledge and students can add to their resume.

7. Connect with social media friends, experts

Many higher education experts have websites with blogs. Some use social media to connect with parents and students. Others are published authors of books and articles. They provide great information and insider tips.

Often, online articles and blogs have a section for readers to comment. Parents can also connect with experts on social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Google+.

Some social media sites have group discussions among experts and parents. There are different Twitter chats for each facet of the college process. LinkedIn members can join specific groups for college-related topics. Summer is a great time to meet and greet new friends.

Also See: Social Media, Family Fun, College Process, College Admission, Summer, Students, Parents
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