No Animals Were Harmed - All About Animal Actors

Posted by johnstocks in Animals on January 9th, 2019

ANIMAL ACTORS: Interview with Sandi Buck, American Humane, Certified Animal Safety Representative

Q: What is the American Humane Film & TV Unit?

A: American Humane (AH) Film & TV Unit is based in Los Angeles and we monitor the use of animals in media. American Humane is a national organization with headquarters based in Denver, Colorado. I'm one of the Certified Animal Safety Representatives who go on set and monitor the use of animals in film and television. We award the "No Animals Were Harmed® in the Making of this Movie" disclaimer seen at the end of the credits in a movie.

Q: How did the American Film & TV Unit start?

A: Back in 1926, AH set up a committee to investigate abuses of animals in the movie industry. At that time, horses were the most at-risk animal actors. But, then, as now, animals have no inherent legal rights, so we couldn't mandate the safety of the animal actors. In 1939, for the film "Jesse James," a horse and rider were sent hurling over a 70-foot cliff into a raging river for an action shot. The stuntman was fine, but the horse's back was broken in the fall and it died. Outrage over this sparked a new relationship between AH and some motion picture directors and producers and caused the Hays Office to include humane treatment of animals in the Motion Picture Code. The following year, AH received authorization to monitor the production of movies using animals. We worked on set for quite a while after that until the Hays Office was disbanded in 1966, ending our jurisdiction and excluding us from sets. This was a pretty dismal time for animal actors who were being used in some brutal ways. Then, in the early 1980s, another incident caused another public outcry and American Humane was added to the agreement with SAG that mandated that union films contact us if they were using animals. This agreement now includes any filmed media form, including television, commercials, direct-to-video projects, and music videos. A more detailed history is on our website. Right now, we monitor about 900 films a year, maybe more. That's not counting commercials.

Q: Did you say animal actors no have legal rights?

A: That's correct. Animals have no "legal" rights in the sense that humans have. But because of our SAG agreement, animal actors in SAG films have "contractual" rights because the AH office must be contacted by productions using animals and an AH Film & TV Unit representative be on set during the filming.

Q: What about nonunion productions?

A: Nonunion productions are not contractually bound to contact us, but we find that a lot of people want us there anyway. I've worked with several productions that say - "We want you here. We want that rating at the end of our film and we want people to know what we had you on set."

Q: So people on set are happy to see you?

A: Generally yes, but sometimes no. Actors always love seeing us there. They look at the AH patches on my jacket and come up to me constantly on set and say - "Oh, you're here for the animals. That's so great, I'm so happy you're here." That's what we want. We want people to look for us, to know we're there, and why we're there. As for production, it depends on their perception of us and if they've worked with us in the past. People we've worked with before love having us there. The ones who haven't worked with us before sometimes think "oh, no, here comes the animal police to patrol us," like I'm going to stand there with my hands on my hips telling them what they can and can't do. It's not like that. We're not there to criticize. We're there to work with filmmakers, not against them. If we see a problem, we'll address it and work it out together. In Florida, for instance, one of the big concerns is heat. During one production, the producer wanted a dog to walk back and forth across the pavement. I told the director there was a problem with this. I already knew he didn't like having me on set, but I told him anyway, "You take off your shoes and walk across that street." He went out to the street, put his hand on the pavement, and said - "Yeah, you're right." He wasn't trying to harm the animal, he just wasn't thinking about the animal, the heat, and the pavement. That's part of the reason we're on set. We don't expect filmmakers to also be animal experts. Even producers who personally don't care about animals usually realize it makes sense for them to have us there. Many people say they won't watch a movie in which they think or have heard that an animal was injured or killed. People look for the AH disclaimer at the end of movies saying - "No Animals Were Harmed® in the Making of this Film."

Q: How do filmmakers get a "No Harm" disclaimer for their movies?

A: The process starts when production contacts our Los Angeles office to let us know that they plan to use animals. We direct them to our Guidelines which are available on the internet and we request their script. We review the script and arrange to come in and observe the animal action to ensure that the conditions in which the animals are working and kept is safe and comfortable. This doesn't cost the union production anything - that's part of the arrangement with the SAG office.

Q: What about nonunion productions? Can they get this "No Animals were Harmed®" disclaimer?

A: The process to get the disclaimer is the same, only there's a an hour fee for the hours we're on set. The time we spend in pre-production script evaluation and then screening the films and writing up reviews is included in that an hour on set fee.

Q: Can student and independent filmmakers get your disclaimer?

A: Definitely, if they meet the guidelines for it. If they have questions, all they need to do is call our LA office and ask. Our LA office is happy to help young and aspiring filmmakers with guidance and information on safely using animals in their films. If they're in the process of writing a script, they can call us and ask if certain scenes are feasible and for advice on how to get the scenes and action they want. Productions who can't get an AH representative on set because of cost or scheduling conflicts can write down what it is they plan to do, document the filming of the animal action with a little video, a behind the scenes - this is how we did it, kind of thing - and send it in. We review it and though we can't say we were actually there, we can say that through our review, it looks like the production followed the Guidelines. That rating is called: "Not Monitored: Production Compliant."

Q: How many ratings are there?

A: We have several ratings which range from our highest "Monitored: Outstanding" and receiving the "No Animals Were Harmed"® disclaimer which appears in the end credits of the film, to "Not Monitored," to our lowest rating which is "Monitored Unacceptable" - where our guidelines and animal safety were disregarded and or negligence caused the injury or death of an animal. Striving for a good rating helps ensure that the production will go well. If a production is half way through shooting and an animal that is key to the movie gets spooked and gets loose or injured, it's like losing a lead human actor. What's the producer going to do? Re-shoot the animal scenes with another animal actor? Rewrite the script? Scrap the movie? Professional trainers have several different dogs with different talents that look alike. One's a really good barking dog, one's a really good jumping dog, another does something else. That helps in the event one dog gets sick or injured, it won't halt filming. A lot of the worst scenarios can be avoided with planning. I look for potential problems and to keep everything as safe as possible for everyone. There can always be accidents, there's no way to prevent that. That happens in life. You can work to make things as safe as possible, but there can still be accidents. We understand that. The bottom line is at that any time filmmakers plan to use animals, even their own pets, they should contact our LA office.

Whether or not one of us comes out to your set, they should refer to our Guidelines For the Safe Use of Animals in Filmed Media so they know what they need to prepare for, to say to themselves - this is what I need to prepare for if I'm going to use an animal on my production. Am I prepared to do what I need to do to make sure that everything is safe for my animal? Having us involved benefits the production in that if there's ever any question as to how a stunt was done the filmmaker can say - call AH. Filmmakers with the reputation of abusing animals for the sake of producing a film or commercial won't get hired and people won't want to watch their movies. We are the only organization authorized to make and uphold these standards and people look for it. When people see animals in films, they look to see that no animals were harmed. If they have any questions on how things were done, they can go to our website and read about it. They can see that this stunt that looks absolutely horrible was actually done with computer graphics, a real animal wasn't even involved.

Q: Are personal pets allowed to be in movies?

A: Our Guidelines recommend that filmmakers use professional animal actors obtained through trainers, but we know that filmmakers, especially small independent and student filmmakers are going to use their own pets or the pets of friends and family in their movies. We understand that, that's a reality in this business. But even if it's no more than filming their own pet cat or dog sitting in a chair or walking across the room, filmmakers should get in the habit of contacting our office. When producers choose dogs, for instance, they should look for dogs with outgoing personalities, dogs that aren't afraid of people. Fear can cause a disaster. The dog can bite someone out of fear if they get in a situation in which they're not comfortable. If more than one dog is to be used on set, the dogs should be used to being around other dogs. If one dog shows aggression toward another dog on set, the aggressive dog must be removed. Dogs that live together and are accustomed to being with each other are good choices.

Q: You mentioned education as being part of the goal of AH. Would you talk some about that?

A: We'd like to work more with film schools developing programs where as part of the curriculum, students take a course or attend a seminar held by an AH representative about using animals in film. If the school can't put us into their program yet, just having our Guidelines available at the school or distributed to students will help educate them. The earlier we reach the students, the better. These filmmakers will grow in their careers and will eventually be involved in large productions where they might end up working on films with large animals. That's the point where you really worry about safety, so the earlier we can educate students, the better.

Q: What can you advise students or aspiring filmmakers wanting to use pets? Your Guidelines can look daunting.

A: If filmmakers choose to use a pet instead of trained animal, we have no control over that but we still recommend they review and adhere to our Guidelines. If the Guidelines seem overwhelming, call our LA office with questions, say - "All I want is for my dog to sit in a chair or walk across the room while we're doing our filming, what are the guidelines?" Most of it is just common sense. Know that the animal you're using is friendly and completely safe to be around people and other animals. You don't want an animal on set that's aggressive, skittish, or snaps. Think about what you're going to do with this animal while you're setting up shots. How many times do you actually need the real animal? Can you use a stuffed animal if there's any concern about using a real animal? You don't want a real dog sitting under hot lights while you're setting up. Go to a toy store and get a stuffie look-alike of whatever animal you're using. Make sure the animal won't be in the way of a moving dolly and that she won't be in area in which she can get stepped on. When she's not being used on set have a suitable place for her to hang out, that she's not running around loose. There needs to be a safe area like a crate or separate room for the animal. Make sure the pet has breaks and gets to lie down and rest or get something to eat and drink. If the pet isn't kept in a crate, make sure it's on a harness or leash so that should she get spooked by a loud noise or quick movement, she can't jump down and run away. Plan ahead and prepare for all possible scenarios. That's critical. If an animal won't do what you want, what are your options? Have back up plans. How far should you go to try to get an animal to do something? If the animal won't or can't do what you want him to do, forcing him is inviting disaster. Even if the animal normally does something, an animal is an animal. You can never predict what it's going to do or not do. It's like working with a child. The producer has to be prepared.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1589832


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Also See: Animal Actors, American Humane, Tv Unit, La Office, Us, Thats, Say

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